28 March 2017 2017 11:00 AM GMT

Can Women Solve The Skills Gap Problem In A Rapidly Growing Clean Energy Sector?

Women can and should, address the skills gap problem in the rapidly growing clean energy sector – globally. That is the bold declaration from Dr. Nina Skorupska CBE, Chief Executive of the Renewable Energy Association (REA); who addressed a significant consequence of the pace of the global energy transition upon the release of Global Energy Talent Index (GETI), the world’s largest global energy sector skills, recruitment, and employment trends report, released by Energyjobline and Airswift.

It states that renewable energy is a rapidly growing field globally, offering huge opportunities. Yet, the report also indicates a potential problem that significantly more skilled workers are needed to match growth in the renewable energy sector. The report offers an insight into an industry that is already rising to the challenge, as despite the skills gap, more women can be found in senior positions compared to in other industries.

Commenting on the release of the GETI Report this week, Dr Skorupska said: “This report is a welcome statement that there is a bright future for young people working in renewable energy and smart technologies globally. UK students and existing energy professionals should consider a career in this rapidly growing field that will be critical in mitigating climate change and creating a sustainable world in the coming decades.

The REA Chief calls on women and young people in the UK to take courses and train in renewables and sustainability in order to help build the low-carbon energy system that’s needed. “The data shows that there are more women in senior positions in renewables than in other energy sectors, but 13 percent isn’t enough! This is a dynamic, exciting, and rapidly shifting industry and I encourage women and men of all backgrounds to become involved.” The GETI survey can be found here.

Dr Skorupska was the first women to run a power station for RWE in the UK. She has held senior positions in global energy companies in the past, including for Essent NV. She was awarded a CBE in 2016 for her service in renewables and for encouraging women to work in the sciences and in engineering. Dr Skorupska is also a Board member of the WISE campaign.

The Renewable Energy Association represents renewable energy producers and promotes the use of all forms of renewable energy in the UK across power, heat, transport and recycling. It is the largest renewable energy and clean technology trade association in the UK, with approximately 700 members, ranging from major multinationals to sole traders.

August 16th 2019
Corporate Sourcing of Renewables Growing, Taking Place in 75 Countries

Companies in 75 countries actively sourced 465 terawatt hours (TWh) of renewable energy in 2017, an amount close to the overall electricity demand of France, according to the report from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). With the continued decline in the costs of renewables, the report suggests, corporate demand will continue to increase as companies seek to reduce electricity bills, hedge against future price spikes and address sustainability concerns.

August 14th 2019
Wind: China Maintains Emerging Markets Top Spot Following 19.7GW Build Boom

Wind industry intelligence service A Word About Wind has launched its Emerging Markets Attractiveness Index report for 2018, which provides insight and analysis into the most attractive emerging markets for wind companies. The index, now in its second year, ranks the top 30 emerging markets that investors should consider when investing in wind in Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America. The list considers factors including political and economic stability for investors, alongside the growth of electricity demand and potential for wind growth, in order to rank the countries by overall potential. As with last year’s report, China tops the list and the ongoing trade war with the US shows no sign of slowing China’s formidable growth.

August 12th 2019
EU Approves Ambitious Energy Efficiency Goals, Encourages Clean Energy Feed-In

Europeans will now be entitled to consume, store and sell the renewable energy they produce in line with ambitious targets set by the EU. The targets are to be reviewed by 2023, and can only be raised, not lowered. By making energy more efficient, Europeans will see their energy bills reduced. In addition, Europe will reduce its reliance on external suppliers of oil and gas, improve local air quality and protect the climate. For the first time, member states will also be obliged to establish specific energy efficiency measures to the benefit of those affected by energy poverty. Member states must also ensure that citizens are entitled to generate renewable energy for their own consumption, to store it and to sell excess production.

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